HANGING FABRIC BAG

There will be a time when neither food or drink, nor reading, exercise or meditation, not chatter or a cocktail will satisfy or fill the gap; the space of time when moments of uncertainty befall us and we wonder o, what now. In my childhood my dad, in his spare time was fixing, tinkering or constructing while my mother could be found canning, sewing, fiddling with a ceramic project or making straw hats.  I watched and learned.  No matter what the daily routine entails finding time for a creative outlet always proved be not only calming physically, mentally and emotionally though more recently found being creative also helps to heal. I unexpectedly discovered how my healing through the written word as I grieved and mourned the death of my mother lead to my putting actual closure on that grief by journaling with paint.  This lead to my book, Tending To My Wounds, Coping with Grief One Square at a Time. 

Whether our day brings stress, joy or a combination of the two being creative helps one unfold and reveal unknown talents. There are many aspects of creativity - to draw, build, design, knit, sing, play an instrument, garden - anything that peaks one’s interest.  Life inspires me to create. To periodically tap into my creative self is rewarding, entertaining and if nothing else, inexpensive therapy. As I periodically share my creativity, beginning with this Hanging Fabric Bag I ask, in what ways do you create?

Clothespin Bag by Debra S. Walling

Clothespin Bag by Debra S. Walling

This handy organizer that can be made in varying sizes to meet many needs — a large bag for hanging in a closet, garage or mudroom to hold recreational gear; a medium size bag for children's toys or balls of yarn and for those who still utilize a clothesline, a small size makes a perfect clothespin bag.  The choice of colors and textures of chosen textile is endless and undeniably makes a nifty little gadget to keep things tidy and organized.  Completed fabric bag can be machined washed.  To prevent damage in washer, knot an old sock over the metal hook.

  1. Prewash fabric to rule out shrinkage prior to cutting desired size, dry and iron fabric if necessary, cut to desired size.
  2. With right sides facing, double-stitch the two pieces together leaving ahalf-inch seam allowance and a 6” opening along one edge.
  3. Turn square right-side out by pulling fabric through the opening.  Either hand stitch shut or machine sew.
  4. Press.
  5. Line up the holes on the clothesline hook mounting plate — one hole on each corner.
  6. Using heavy duty carpet thread, appropriate needle for thread, making certain it fits through the holes of button choice.
     
Clothespin Bag by Debra Walling, top view

Clothespin Bag by Debra Walling, top view

Clothespin Bag by Debra Walling, top view

Clothespin Bag by Debra Walling, top view

Giving Credit Where Credit is Due :   Taken from an overstuffed binder of collected items to make, this hanging fabric bag was among the choices. Unfortunately the name of the magazine does not show on the printed page, only that it is from a July 2002 issue.